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Emily Polk
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Appointment-Based Writing Tutor

Emily Polk

About

Emily Polk is an Advanced Lecturer in the Program in Writing and Rhetoric. She has a Ph.D. in Communication from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and a Masters in Human Rights from Columbia University. She researches and presents her work focused on climate change communication and the mobilization of global social movements in the digital and public spheres. Prior to getting her doctorate, Emily worked for nearly ten years around the world as a media professional, helping to produce radio documentaries in Burmese refugee camps, and facilitating a human rights-based newspaper in a Liberian refugee camp. She has also worked as an editor at Whole Earth Magazine and at CSRwire, a leading global source of corporate social responsibility news. Her own writing and radio documentaries have appeared in National Geographic Traveler, the Boston Globe, NPR, The National Radio Project, AlterNet, the Indian Express, Central America Weekly, the Ghanaian Chronicle, and Creative Nonfiction, among others. Her first book, Communicating Global to Local Resiliency: A Case Study of the Transition Movement, was released in 2015.

Emily's PWR courses focus on global development, climate change, and resilience, and invite students to interrogate the discourses (and assumptions) around the approaches, methods, and ideologies regarding how and when social change happens.

School of Earth, Energy, and Environmental Sciences Writing Specialist

Areas of specialization: social science, journalism, creative writing

All genres

Enoys coaching goal setting, brainstorming, revision strategies, writing for publication 

Writing Specialist Consultation by appointment. Email: empolk@stanford.edu

Contact

(650) 721-6093

Location

Sweet 323

Office Hours

Monday 1:00pm-2:00pm and Wednesday 9:30am-11:30am PACIFIC

Research Interests

SPECIALIZATION: Facilitation and Mobilization of Social Movements in the Digital and Public Spheres; Communication of Community-Led Responses to Climate Change; the Role and Impact of Scholar Activism; Participatory Research; Rhetoric of Sustainability and Resiliency; Rhetoric of Global and Local Development